Let us together build a new community,where we can live in peace and share some fun!
 
HomeHome  PortalPortal  CalendarCalendar  GalleryGallery  FAQFAQ  SearchSearch  RegisterRegister  MemberlistMemberlist  UsergroupsUsergroups  Log inLog in  

Share | 
 

 Special Christmas food/drinks or cakes from our contries

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
Vigs Thy girl
Admin
Admin
avatar

Female
Number of posts : 1069
Age : 56
Location : On top of the King Dune in Nature/National park Thy
Job/hobbies : reading, writing, needlework, music, lots of colours, animals
Humor : I\'m a funny girl
Registration date : 2007-10-08

PostSubject: Special Christmas food/drinks or cakes from our contries   Thu Nov 15, 2007 3:46 pm

rendeer Here you can tell us about things you eat or drink in the Christmas and if you can, it could be funny to get a recipe how to make the food, cake or drink. rendeer


_________________
Viggos wilderness girl!

You got it into yourself to be good at anything, you aim at. The fact is, that you must never give up. Accept what you are and be proud of it, be grateful for it. But never let it go to the head, always keep the feet on the ground. (From Bear Hearts wisdom). Add: Could have been Viggos, too!!!


Last edited by on Sat Nov 17, 2007 5:04 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top Go down
View user profile
afrodita
Admin
Admin
avatar

Female
Number of posts : 869
Age : 26
Location : Gondor
Job/hobbies : Writing poetry
Humor : Very good,some people say
Registration date : 2007-10-08

PostSubject: Re: Special Christmas food/drinks or cakes from our contries   Thu Nov 15, 2007 10:04 pm

I am usually making a Christmas diet-chocolate and champagne,all day and night dr

_________________
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://viggoshome.netgoo.org
Vigs Thy girl
Admin
Admin
avatar

Female
Number of posts : 1069
Age : 56
Location : On top of the King Dune in Nature/National park Thy
Job/hobbies : reading, writing, needlework, music, lots of colours, animals
Humor : I\'m a funny girl
Registration date : 2007-10-08

PostSubject: Re: Special Christmas food/drinks or cakes from our contries   Fri Nov 16, 2007 12:20 am

[url=]The Christmas brew
[/url]
The inner spirit is well taken care of by the famous Danish breweries, too. Each year in November Carlsberg and Tuborg release the new Christmas beer. This beer is both darker and stronger than the traditional lager and is presented in a festive manner along the lines of the new French red wine, Beaujolais Nouveau.

_________________
Viggos wilderness girl!

You got it into yourself to be good at anything, you aim at. The fact is, that you must never give up. Accept what you are and be proud of it, be grateful for it. But never let it go to the head, always keep the feet on the ground. (From Bear Hearts wisdom). Add: Could have been Viggos, too!!!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Vigs Thy girl
Admin
Admin
avatar

Female
Number of posts : 1069
Age : 56
Location : On top of the King Dune in Nature/National park Thy
Job/hobbies : reading, writing, needlework, music, lots of colours, animals
Humor : I\'m a funny girl
Registration date : 2007-10-08

PostSubject: Re: Special Christmas food/drinks or cakes from our contries   Fri Nov 16, 2007 12:21 am

[url=]Christmas luncheons
[/url]
The Christmas brew plays a major roll in many of the traditional Danish luncheons that every single company with more than one employee carry out every year in December. Most hotels, inns and restaurants offer special Christmas dishes on their menus and every single canteen from Skagen in the far North of Denmark to Gedser in the far South is occupied with this very important question: -What are we going to have for our Christmas luncheon?

The answer is really quite simple: The traditional Danish kitchen offers a wide variety of cold and warm dishes which all belong to this famous ritual, normally offered at a buffet:
Salmon and herring prepared in different ways and with different dressings, shrimps, lobster and crab, filet of fried plaice with remoulade, fried sausage (medisterpølse) and meatballs (frikadeller) with red cabbage and beets, roast pork and bacon with fried apples, sirloin of pork with soft fried onions, black pudding with sirup, liverpaste with bacon and champignon, hamburger with fried egg, sunny side up, fried duck, a variety of cold cuts, chicken- and fruit salad, different kinds of cheese med fruit and ris à l’amande with cherrysauce. Everyting is eaten with white and dark bread and butter and to go through it all demands both a strong physique and a mind of steel.

To make it all go down well you not only have the beer (or wine - or even sparkling water for the drivers) but also the Christmas snaps, which like the beer is presented every year before Christmas.

_________________
Viggos wilderness girl!

You got it into yourself to be good at anything, you aim at. The fact is, that you must never give up. Accept what you are and be proud of it, be grateful for it. But never let it go to the head, always keep the feet on the ground. (From Bear Hearts wisdom). Add: Could have been Viggos, too!!!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Vigs Thy girl
Admin
Admin
avatar

Female
Number of posts : 1069
Age : 56
Location : On top of the King Dune in Nature/National park Thy
Job/hobbies : reading, writing, needlework, music, lots of colours, animals
Humor : I\'m a funny girl
Registration date : 2007-10-08

PostSubject: Re: Special Christmas food/drinks or cakes from our contries   Fri Nov 16, 2007 12:31 am

[url=]Traditional baking
[/url]
As Christmas approaches all kinds of preparations accelerate in each and every Danish home. Remarkably, the old Scandinavian tradition has survived more og less untouched even in these modern times. Cerlainly, Christmas has been commercialized like everywhere else but all Danes - even young and hard core computer freaks - give in to their heritage at this particular time of the year. Everybody tries to participate in the preparation for Christmas Eve, however humble the effort!

The last two weeks before Christmas the great baking period begins - naturally with the kids playing the major rolls. Ginger cookies made from old traditioal recipies, deep fried crullers, vanilla bisquits and gingerbread shaped as hearts and decorated with ribbons - every family has favorite formulas from way back that has to be carried out at this time of the year.

While the oven is working overtime all agile persons are concentrated in creating
Christmas decorations for the house or the tree and sweetmeats or candies out of marzipan, chocolate fudge, almonds, dates, hazelnuts and crystallized fruits and berries. Luckily, the demand for clean hands and fingernails is top priority at this time of the ear!

_________________
Viggos wilderness girl!

You got it into yourself to be good at anything, you aim at. The fact is, that you must never give up. Accept what you are and be proud of it, be grateful for it. But never let it go to the head, always keep the feet on the ground. (From Bear Hearts wisdom). Add: Could have been Viggos, too!!!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Vigs Thy girl
Admin
Admin
avatar

Female
Number of posts : 1069
Age : 56
Location : On top of the King Dune in Nature/National park Thy
Job/hobbies : reading, writing, needlework, music, lots of colours, animals
Humor : I\'m a funny girl
Registration date : 2007-10-08

PostSubject: Re: Special Christmas food/drinks or cakes from our contries   Fri Nov 16, 2007 1:39 am

Here are some recipes for traditional Danish Christmas dishes, a few cakes and the drink called Glögg/Gloegg or Glühwein as the Germans call it.

http://www.visitdenmark.dk/uk/en-gb/menu/turist/inspiration/jul/typical-christmas-dishes.htm?wbc_purpose=Basic

_________________
Viggos wilderness girl!

You got it into yourself to be good at anything, you aim at. The fact is, that you must never give up. Accept what you are and be proud of it, be grateful for it. But never let it go to the head, always keep the feet on the ground. (From Bear Hearts wisdom). Add: Could have been Viggos, too!!!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Vigs Thy girl
Admin
Admin
avatar

Female
Number of posts : 1069
Age : 56
Location : On top of the King Dune in Nature/National park Thy
Job/hobbies : reading, writing, needlework, music, lots of colours, animals
Humor : I\'m a funny girl
Registration date : 2007-10-08

PostSubject: Re: Special Christmas food/drinks or cakes from our contries   Sat Nov 17, 2007 12:38 am

Peppernuts (small cookies).

Old recipe for PEPPERNUTS (I try to convert the grammes into ounces as I guess that's what you use when you cook and bake).

Temperature in the owen: 200º C (= 392º F)

Around 100 peppernuts

125 g. (= 4,41 ounces) sugar
125 g. (= 4.41 ounces) margarine
1 egg
½ teaspoon ground ginger
3/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper
1 teaspoon soda or baking powder
275g (= 9.70 ounces) flour
------------------------------

Mix sugar and margarine well together.
Add the egg and mix it good.
Blend the spices into the flour and knead it good with the egg, sugar and margarine mix.
Roll out the dough in rolls (the same thickness as a finger), sprinkle a little flour on the table.
Cut the rolls in bits between ½ - 2 cm (0,02 - 0,79 inches).
Roll them to round pellets and put them on a baking tray with paper (not too close as they get larger)
Bake them at 200º C (392º F) in around 10 - 12 minutes.

Keep them in an airtight canister for cookies.

_________________________________________

Enjoy the baking!!!


_________________
Viggos wilderness girl!

You got it into yourself to be good at anything, you aim at. The fact is, that you must never give up. Accept what you are and be proud of it, be grateful for it. But never let it go to the head, always keep the feet on the ground. (From Bear Hearts wisdom). Add: Could have been Viggos, too!!!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
afrodita
Admin
Admin
avatar

Female
Number of posts : 869
Age : 26
Location : Gondor
Job/hobbies : Writing poetry
Humor : Very good,some people say
Registration date : 2007-10-08

PostSubject: Re: Special Christmas food/drinks or cakes from our contries   Sun Nov 18, 2007 1:04 am

Bulgarian Foods





If there were 10 million tour and travel pages on the Internet, 15
million times you would read "The most delicious food you have ever
tasted." So I won't tell you this because you expect it and the food is
only but one thing which will impress you about this land. The
Bulgarian menu will vary according to the annual rotation of the
seasons. The vegetables, fruits and spices are spread around the
different seasons and are to be consumed fresh. In a similar manner,
the use of meat also depends upon the season; lamb is more common in
spring, light meat such as chicken, veal and vegetarian meals are
prevalent in summer. During the entire winter, pork meat is prevalent.
Fresh fish is consumed during the entire year. One could say the
Bulgarian cuisine is rather "meat-less" than "meat-full". Statistics
say that Bulgarians consume 2 times less meat compared with the new
members of the EU. The average meat consumption in Bulgaria is 3.06 kg
per capita per month. Everything here is FRESH and nothing tastes like
plastic or cardboard: Milk and cheese come straight from the cow or
goat, fruits and vegetables are straight from the garden, eggs come
straight from the chicken down the street! Oh, and you must try the
honey which the Bulgarian Bees have so lovingly prepared for your
morning tea! The point is --- here the food is much better and tastier
than you ever expected it to be.
Bulgaria is a land of traditions and there are three very special food
item varieties which are unique to Bulgaria and have been a part of it
back through the earliest of Thracian times

1. Cheese

White Cheese - a particular variety of the increasingly-popular Greek
Feta cheese now popular in many places. It originated on the Balkan
Peninsula in a region called Trakia, which is the current day Southern
Bulgaria. This Bulgarian sirene has much the same texture as the Greek
feta. It is a brined cheese, produced from sheep or cows milk, and is
both used on the table and as an essential part of other foods from
Shopska Salad to Banitza. Feta Cheese is produced in many different
countries, but it is widely known that Bulgarian-made Feta is the best
addition to this white cheese, another common Bulgarian cheese is
Yellow Cheese or "Kashkaval". This hard yellow table cheese, made of
sheep's milk, may otherwise be called The Cheddar Cheese of the
Balkans. It is frequently served as "fried cheese" .The Kashkaval
(Kashkaval Pane) is especially good when freshly breaded (dipped in egg
then rolled in bread crumbs) and deep-fried. You'll find it's not gooey
and much more flavorful than mozzarella.

2. Yoghurt

Yoghurt - again, a particular variety produced by the Lactobacterium
Bulgaricum bacteria. It grows no place else in the world. Yoghurt
("kiselo mlyako" - literally meaning sour milk) has found an important
part in many Bulgarian foods. Bulgarians are also fond of "Arjan" a
beverage of water mixed with yoghurt. Yoghurt can be purchased in many
different grades and qualities, each characteristic of the quality of
the milk to which the bacteria culture has been added. Yogurt junkies,
this is your promised land - the quality, taste and choices for yogurt
you'll find in Bulgaria are unsurpassed!
The most
common commercial brand is "Danone" (Bulgarian humor reminds us that
"da" = "yes", "no" = "but", "ne" = "no"). Be sure you try the
wonderfully-rich, buttery-tasting "Bivolsko mylako" produced from the
milk of water buffalo. It is by now found everywhere in Bulgaria, but
most commonly in the mountain areas around Shipka village and the town
of Gabrovo. The ancient people that inhabited the territory of
contemporary Bulgaria - the Thraceans - would consume a lot of "thick
milk" that in their language sounded like "yog urt." Bulgarians eat
yogurt in some form practically every day throughout their life. It is
a matter of fact that the ecologically clean dairy products made in the
Rhodope mountain region has anti-cancer effect, according to a resent
survey over the biodiversity in the region of the Middle Rhodopes. The
results of the survey were reported by Professor Dr Venelin Kafedjiev
in the outset of a UN-sponsored eco project under the title "The
Rhodopes for protecting biodiversity".
The team of Prof Kafedjiev found that during the process of dairy production in
the Rhodopes region of southern Bulgaria, a specific acid is being
synthesized which came into the focus of scientists with its supposedly
anti-cancer effect. Researches said that it might be because of that
specific acid that local people are famous for their longevity.
Some 200,000 tons of Bulgarian yoghurt are sold in Japan each year,
Shigetaro Asano, President of MEIJI Dairies Japanese Corporation,
announced during his visit in Bulgaria. The considerable increase in
the sale of Bulgarian yoghurt in Japan come as the trend for healthier
lifestyle has been gathering momentum in Japan for the last five-ten
years. In 1973 MEIJI launched production of Bulgarian yoghurt using
Bulgarian technology and LB Bulgaricum license. For more than 30 years
now the company has been Japan's biggest producer of yoghurt and
sponsor of various events related to Bulgaria.
Millions of people around the world, who do not have the slightest idea where
Bulgaria is, happily swallow the content of packs labeled Bulgarian
Yogurt every day. They believe this food will make them strong and
healthy and with a good reason since the benevolent bacterium which is
used to produce yogurt - Bulgaricum - has been proven to have wonderful
effect on human organisms. At the dawn of the 20th century, the French
scholar (of Bulgarian origin) Iliya Mlechnikov was awarded the Nobel
Prize for his research after he noted Bulgarian villagers living mainly
on yogurt often reached more than 100 years in age.

3. Spices

Chubritsa- this plant, which botanists claim to be a species of the herb
Satureia hortensis appears to grow particularly well upon Bulgarian
soil. It also shares certain characteristics with Oregano (Origanum
vulgare). The dried leaves are crushed and sprinked on top of soups in
the last few minutes of cooking or ground into a fine powder and used
on bread like butter
Parsley- This is
probably the most widely used spice in Bulgaria since ancient times.
Its leaves are applied fresh or dried to flavour and add vitamins to
soups, broth and main courses, as an ingredient of vegetable preserves,
or to decorate salads, roasted meat or fish in all seasons.
Thyme
- It is also called granny's soul or shepherd's basil. Fresh or
dried, it is used for seasoning meat and vegetable dishes or soups, and
bean, pea or bread-bean stews, and sauces; Thyme is also added to
salads and pickles.
Onion- While some
dieticians consider it to be a spice, others do not. In either case, it
is worth mentioning that onions are grown everywhere in Bulgaria and
are widely applied in Bulgarian cookery. The onion stimulates our
appetite and secretion of gastric juices. The onion is used in the
preparation of salads, sauces, stews, vegetable and meat dishes,
preserves. Fresh onion is a basic ingredient of many salads.
The abundance of mineral waters may be seen as one other important factor
in the healthy nature of the Bulgarian people. Most notable are the
spring-fed water sources quite close to Plovdiv in the towns of Hisarja
(Hissar) and Brasigovo. In Hissar, the total outflow of the springs
exceeds 4500 liter per minute. The water is very low in dissolved
solids, about 230 mg per liter, with a temperature ranging from 37° to
51°C. People travel to Hisarja from a wide area to take a supply of
water from a specially erected fountain near the Momina salza
pavilion. This water is also useful for treatment of predominantly
gastrointestinal disorders. There are many other similar springs
throughout Bulgaria and a large portion of their waters is bottled
commercially and consumed in homes and restaurants in preference to the
chemically-treated municipal water.
For your fresh salad, you will always find
oil and vinegar on the table. The westernized palate may feel a bit short-changed as
few restaurants will have Bleu Cheese, Roquefort, Ranch or Thousand
Island. These manufactured dressings are not usually a part of
Bulgarian cuisine.
Native spirits are highly
potent and not expensive. The most popular local product is rakiya, or
brandy. Slivova rakiya is made from plums, Kaisieva rakiya from
apricots, and grozdova from grapes - Pomorska rakiya is the best
example of the latter. Rakiya is usually accompanied by a soft drink
and a salad or appetizer. Imported whisky is cheaper than in the West,
but much of it is counterfeit. Buy it from the bigger outlets, and
avoid the stuff sold at the smaller kiosks and by street traders.And
then there is the popular "boza". This is a thick fermented beverage
with a sweet-sour taste. Boza is made using roasted flour which gives
it a brownish or rosy color. It almost has the appearance of chocolate .
As the beverage is fermented, it has a slight (4% or less) alcohol
content. Millet-flour boza is preferred, but it may be made from wheat,
barley, oat or corn flour.
[Boza, the translation of
which is sometimes given as "millet ale," and which is accented on the
second syllable, looks just like Amizake Almond Rice shake. The taste?
Ever since this place was called Thrace, which was quite a while ago,
foreigners have been trying to describe Boza to the folks back home. It
tastes kind of like mushed-up Quaker Puffed Wheat, mixed with that
liquid that's on the top when you first open a can of kidney beans.
Plus the faintest hints of kerosene and mothballs. There is, of course,
a generational divide over Boza, many younger people gravitating toward
lighter, smoother Western-style drinks such as Windex and Pine Sol.]
Honey
is another traditional Bulgarian product; it has been produced here for
more than 3,000 years. You may be surprised to learn that Honey bees
did not exist in England's American Colonies, so the new settlers had
no "sweets" in their diet. Unfortunately, some Americans put the
existence of sugar in the same category as air and water, but the facts
are that sugar was an imported expensive luxury from the South Pacific
in 17th century Europe and was not even introduced into the U. S. until
1751 in Louisiana, just 25 years before Jefferson wrote the Declaration
of Independence. There are many small independent beekeepers found in
the rural Bulgarian communities, and often more honey is produced than
is demanded by local consumers. Because pure natural honey is the only
food that will never spoil, the excess honey is stored, sometimes for
years, in whatever containers the beekeeper has available until a
broker shows up to buy it. Also, bee pollen (collected when the honey
bee walks through a pollen trap that is placed underneath the main
beehive) is sold in the local markets.
Bulgaria
exports an average of 5.5 metric tons of honey per year, mostly to
Germany, Greece and Russia. Our agricultural diversity results in many
varieties of honey, including product from the blossoms of sunflower,
conifer (pine), acacia, linden, oak and various herbs and other
flowers. One variety of the honey produced in Bulgaria has the effect
of Viagra. In a sensational article published in "The Times of India"
newspaper, it is reported that Bulgarian bee-keepers produce honey from
thistle. The product is a natural and cheaper alternative of any
medicine for impotence, the article reads. "Honey really works;
thousands of Bulgarians consume it and nobody said it wouldn't work,"
Georgy Iliev, head of the Bulgarian Bee-Keepers' Association said in an
interview published by the newspaper.The
day of St. Haralampi, the Orthodox patron saint of bee-keepers, is
marked on February 10th. It is believed that this saint was the first
one who discovered the healing powers of honey and bee products. See
also this photo of an open market stand selling honey and fresh spices.</p>
<p>So
these are some of the characteristic features which lend their specific
taste and flavour to the Bulgarian national dishes. Perhaps because
they are memorable, those features have helped to make the cuisine
popular far beyond the country's borders. It is the style of the
Bulgarian cook to see the concurrent heating of products on a low fire,
knowing that the food must simmer gently on all accounts - boil, roast
or stew. That is the way to retain the nutritive qualities, while
achieving correct flavor and taste. The same effect is also achieved
through the variety of products, which agree well with the seasonings
and fats. Seasoning is usually subtle and unobtrusive. Food is normally
served only warm, not piping hot
As to methods of
preparation - since times immemorial the Bulgarians have favoured
stewing, roasting, boiling and the earthenware dish. The roasting of
food on charcoal embers is also widespread, leaving the meat
deliciously tender and succulent. Often many of the stews and
casseroles are delivered to the table in a lidded brown crock called a
gyuvech. If many of the dishes you find here seem Turkish, why not?
Bulgaria was occupied by the Ottomans for five centuries.



When the
Turks retreated, they both borrowed from the Bulgarian ways and left
some of their own tradition behind

_________________


Last edited by on Sun Nov 18, 2007 1:16 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://viggoshome.netgoo.org
afrodita
Admin
Admin
avatar

Female
Number of posts : 869
Age : 26
Location : Gondor
Job/hobbies : Writing poetry
Humor : Very good,some people say
Registration date : 2007-10-08

PostSubject: Re: Special Christmas food/drinks or cakes from our contries   Sun Nov 18, 2007 1:14 am

You will want to
sample the rich variety of local meat, vegetables, fruit and breads
found in well-prepared and colorful, interesting dishes. Every good
restaurant cook will add a sprig or two of parsley for garnish, perhaps
also with a slice of tomato, cucumber or a carrot curl. A Bulgarian
breakfast might start with some of Bulgaria's yogurt, with a delicious
strudel made with spinach or cheese (banitza). For variety, I highly
recommend a krenvirshka.This is a basic,
hot-dog-like sausage, wrapped and baked in a light bread pastry.For
lunch or dinner, there might be a mixed salad with sheep milk cheese
("shopska salata") followed by a tasty stew of meat or pork with
paprikas ("slav gyuvech") or vegetables ("gyuvech zarzavat"), stuffed
peppers, vine leaves' sarmi, or aubergines. You might want to enjoy
some of the Turkish and Middle Eastern desserts such as baklava (flaky
pastry stuffed with crushed pistachio nuts coated in a sweet syrup) and
kadayif (shredded wheat stuffed with nuts in syrup). There is also a
great variety of cakes filled with buttercream, fruit, or chocolate as
well as ice cream.
More than one visitor has reminisced
and said "I am convinced the original Garden of Eden was in Bulgaria."
Or "I have never had such wonderful fruit in my life as when I was
there." In recent times, a shopper would pay 90
Leva for 1 kg of meat as opposed to 3 Leva for 1 kg of grain from an
average income of 800 Leva. Meat prices have by now risen in relation
to the price of grain, and the situation in other Eastern European
countries is not much different. Think how little food a family will
have if they must buy one kg of meat as opposed to how long they will
be able to survive on the amount of grain they can buy for the same
price; grain from which so many delicious and nutritous dishes can be
prepared.

Bulgaria has one of the lowest per capita meat consumption figures in
Europe. It is custom that a pig is slaughtered for Christmas eating,
and through the year pork, veal, beef and lamb are eaten in moderation.
Commonly, meat is cooked with fruit, for example veal with quinces. In
Bulgarian traditional meat cookery, sauces are not common. A roast may
be marinated but served dry with cooked vegetables.Kebapche
is a local favorite. This is grillled ground meat and spices in sausage
form. In patty form, it's called Kyufte, but it's all the same. The
meat is either pork or chicken or veal, sometimes a mixture of chicken
and the other mixed with very finely minced onion, water, cumin, salt
and pepper. It's served with fried potatoes and a beer ("bira") or soft
drink. Know that when a Bulgarian says "fried potatoes" they are
speaking of potatoes deep-fried in oil. The American-style fried,
"hashed" potatoes are not at all common.There is little
difference in the contents of the Bulgarian cook's larder from your
own; common meats are pork, beef, lamb, chicken and fish. Staples
include rice, corn, beans and lentils. Vegetables include potatoes,
cabbage (both green and red), carrots, tomatoes, green peppers,
eggplant, cucumbers, garlic, zucchini, pumpkin, onions (yellow and
green), peas, celery, spinach, cauliflower, green and lima beans,
lettuce, radishes, turnips, mushrooms, olives and fruits such as
cherries, raspberries, strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, apples,
peaches, pears, plums, apricots, watermelons, melons, grapes, quinces
and medlars. All of these basic ingredients are grown in Bulgaria.
Cooking oil is almost always sunflower oil. It is light enough that it
blends easily with foods while cooking and does not impart a greasy
taste. Bread may be lightly brushed with sunflower oil and toasted in a
hot pan to a delicious golden color.There is a section
at the top of this page with more information on Bulgarian Cirene with
some useful recipes. Other unique recipes are found in the links menu
at the top of this page.Bread is the most important
mainstay of the Bulgarian diet and is eaten with every meal. Bulgarians
consume more bread than the people in the neighboring countries - more
than 10 kg per person monthly. Most commonly seen is the shops is bread
like the one pictured below. The crisp, thin outer crust is cracked in
places on top and nearly glistens; inside is of a coarse yet soft,
white texture. Of course many other styles and types of bread are to be
found - including whole-wheat and pre-sliced.

_________________
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://viggoshome.netgoo.org
afrodita
Admin
Admin
avatar

Female
Number of posts : 869
Age : 26
Location : Gondor
Job/hobbies : Writing poetry
Humor : Very good,some people say
Registration date : 2007-10-08

PostSubject: Re: Special Christmas food/drinks or cakes from our contries   Sun Nov 18, 2007 1:25 am

Banitza




Bulgarian Christmas is a remarkable fusion of Eastern Orthodox
Christianity and subtle pagan traditions. The night of Dec. 24 bears a
special importance filled with symbolism. One gets together with the
closest family and feasts on a special set of seven vegetarian dishes
waiting for midnight. At midnight once the birth of Jesus is announced
one can either listen to the chanting of old, long-bearded priests in
lavish robes in a church surrounded by golden ornaments, thousands of
candles and thyme aroma, or one can choose to stay at home, exchange
presents and decipher the future. One
of the ways to take a sneak preview of the upcoming year is by cracking
walnuts open and seeing how good they are- a healthy, crisp walnut
stands for a prosperous year, while a rotten one… well, that's quite
obvious.<br>Additionally we like to spice our bread and pastries up
with fortunes. While my family goes for the home baked bread, most of
the families prepare "banitza" - a fillo dough-layered pastry with feta
cheese and eggs. How to make it? Keep on reading…
Ingredients:12 sheets Fillo dough 500 grams Feta cheese
(if you can get Bulgarian white cheese- choose it instead)
1 stick butter (melted)<br>4-5 eggs <br>one cup soda water
pinch of salt 8-10 separate small sheets of paper with fortunes
written on them rolled in foil
Instructions:
Crumble
the cheese in a bowl and mix with all the eggs but one. Oil a
medium-size deep oven dish, cover bottom with a sheet of fillo,
sprinkle melted butter, cover with the next sheet, and continue until
you have used four sheets. Then pour half of the egg and
cheese mixture. Cover with four more sheets. Pour the rest of the
mixture. Place the fortunes strategically. Place four more sheets
finishing with the rest of the butter. Take a sharp knife and cut into
even squared pieces. Pour the rest of the butter in the cuts. Mix the
last egg with the soda water and pour on top of the banitza. Cook
in a preheated oven (350 F) for about 40 minutes or until the banitza
has risen slightly and has nicely browned on top. Leave to cool for
about 30 minutes and serve. Perfect with youghurt on the side.
Vesela Koleda! (Merry Christmas!)

_________________
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://viggoshome.netgoo.org
afrodita
Admin
Admin
avatar

Female
Number of posts : 869
Age : 26
Location : Gondor
Job/hobbies : Writing poetry
Humor : Very good,some people say
Registration date : 2007-10-08

PostSubject: Re: Special Christmas food/drinks or cakes from our contries   Mon Nov 19, 2007 4:33 pm




The Christmas pudding

Of course, no traditional English Christmas dinner would be complete without the flaming plum pudding...also known as the Christmas pudding, figgy pudding or "hackin" due to its many ingredients. This pudding is a once-a-year treat and customary end to the Christmas meal. However, the modern day delicious dessert began as something very different. It originated as a Fourteenth Century porridge known as "frumenty," which was made by boiling beef and mutton with raisins, currants, prunes, wines and spices. More often than not, "frumenty" would be eaten as a soup served as a fasting dish in preparation for the Christmas festivities.
By 1595, "frumenty" began to evolve into the modern day plum pudding, having been thickened with eggs, breadcrumbs and dried fruit...the meat ingredient was also removed and the pudding was given more flavor by the addition of ale and spirits. However, in 1664, the Puritans banned its consumption as being "lewd," describing the pudding's rich ingredients as "unfit for God-fearing people." George I, having tasted and enjoyed plum pudding, reestablished the custom as part of the royal Christmas feast in 1714, despite objections voiced by the Quakers who regarded it as "the invention of the scarlet whore of Babylon." However, the Christmas pudding tradition did not not become firmly established until the Victorian Era, largely due to the influence of Prince Albert, consort of the Queen, and by that time had evolved into something which looked very similar to the puddings consumed today.

Over the years, many superstitions have surrounded this popular seasonal dessert (which, incidentally, does not get its name from plums, but from the process of "plumming," which means to plump-up raisins and currants with warm brandy and then mold the result with suet and a small amount of batter). It is said that puddings should be made by the 25th Sunday after Trinity (or the last Sunday prior to Advent, also known as "Stir-Up Sunday"), prepared with thirteen ingredients to represent Christ and his Disciples, and that every member of the family should take turns in stirring the mixture with a wooden spoon from east to west (in honor of the Three Kings), while making a wish at the same time. Some customs are associated with the prelude to Christ's death. When the brandy (or other favored alcoholic beverage with which the pudding is drenched) is set alight, the flame is said to represent Christ's passion, while a decorative sprig of holly is a reminder of the "Crown of Thorns." A silver coin within the pudding is another ancient custom which is believed to bring wealth and happiness to whoever finds it. Other items have been put into the mixture over the years...rings to symbolize marriage within the coming year, thimbles and buttons which predict that the finders will remain unmarried, and a sixpence which grants the wish of the above-mentioned stirrer of the mixture, for example.

Matthew Walker is Britain's largest producer of Christmas puddings and it is estimated that over 40 million people who reside in the United Kingdom annually finish their yuletide festive meal with a serving of this delicious dessert. It has been suggested that the modern Christmas fruit cake is a derivative of the traditional Christmas pudding.


_________________
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://viggoshome.netgoo.org
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Special Christmas food/drinks or cakes from our contries   

Back to top Go down
 
Special Christmas food/drinks or cakes from our contries
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Viggo's home under the sky :: Site discussion :: Whatever-
Jump to:  

©2009 Viggo's home under the sky
How to make a forum | © phpBB | Free forum support | Report an abuse | Free forum